the 18 i read in 2018

This year has been pretty full on in terms of books. Along with writing my own (yep, that finally happened) I devoured tonnes – in particular lots of books I’d never think of picking off the shelves myself, which is always a bonus.

I’ve done a round up below of the eighteen which were that good (or bad) they’ve made the highlight reel. Here’s to lots more reading in 2019 (and lots more writing!)

1. Northern Lights – Phillip Pullman

2. Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine – Gail Honeyman

3. How To Catch A Star – Oliver Jeffers

4. The Truth Pixie – Matt Haig

5. The Chalk Man – C J Tudor

6. A Very Large Expanse Of Sea – Tahereh Mafi

7. The Beauty That Remains – Ashley Woodfolk

8. The Sun and Her Flowers – Rupi Kaur

9. All The Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr

10. The Queen Of Bloody Everything – Joanna Nadin

11. Some Kind Of Wonderful – Giovanna Fletcher

12. What Belongs To You – Gareth Greenwell

13. The Secret Life Of Bees – Sue Monk Kidd

14. Still Me – JoJo Moyes

15. Papillon – Henri Charriere

16. The Man I Think I Know – Mike Gayle

17. The Seven Imperfect Rules of Elvira Carr

18. How To Be Happy – Eva Woods

 

I hope this gives you lots of inspiration for your tbr piles (or spurs you on to finish the book that’s been sat on your bedside table for the past month.)

love sophie

writing prompts to scream about

BOO!

In the spirit of Halloween, I’m treating you all to five deadly writing prompts that will keep even the most bloodshot eyes reading… Have a stab at them and let me know what you think!

 

1. Write what you know…

What’s the scariest thing that’s ever happened to you? Why was it so scary? Can you describe it in detail?

Sometimes, our best writing comes when we know exactly what we’re doing (whether it’s based on real life, or just because we’ve planned it.)

 

2. Characterisation…

Create your own ‘monster’… why is it a monster? What does it look like? How does it sound? Put it in different situations/settings – how does it react?

 

3. Retelling…

It is common for lots of popular books, e.g. fairytales, to be rewritten/told in a different way. Pick one of your favourite books and add a monster/scary character. What does this mean for the protagonist? How does it change the story?

 

4. Dialogue…

A great way to start writing is by using a line of dialogue. Try and continue the story from the line below.

‘Did you miss me?’ the porcelain doll said, before rolling off the shelf and splintering into a thousand pieces, blood covering the floor.

 

5. Comedy…

Not all horror is/has to be scary. Try and write a classic horror story but with humour added. What happens? How do the characters change?

 

I hope you find these ideas useful – and if you have any yourself, I’d love to hear them!

love sophie